+Do I need travel visa to visit Nepal ?

All foreign nationals (except Indians) require a visa to enter Nepal. Visas are obtainable from embassies abroad on arrival at Tribhuvan International Airport and at some land borders (including borders with India and Tibet).

Getting a visa at the airport can sometimes take time due to long queues. There have been instances when passengers were asked to show return flight tickets. You will also need to provide two passport photos and the following fees in US dollars cash. Other currencies are also accepted although rates may differ. The following costs were correct at time of writing:

– Multi entry visa valid for 15 days – US$25
– Multi entry visa valid for 30 days – US$40
– Multi entry visa valid for 90 days – US$100

Please note if you are staying in Nepal for less than 24 hours while in transit a transit visa can be issued on presentation of your international flight ticket, there is a nominal charge of US$5 and one photo is required.

Your visa application form may require you to state the dates on which you enter and exit that country. Please note we suggest you list your date of entry a few days before, and date of exit a few days after, your intended dates in case you encounter any delays or problems en route. To help calculate the exact dates of these crossings we have found the website www.timeanddate.com to be very useful.

While tipping isn’t mandatory in Nepal, it’s considered polite to leave service workers in restaurants and cafes a 10% tip if a service charge hasn’t already been included in the bill.

Travelers will be able to access the internet WIFI in large cities like Kathmandu. Smaller towns, isolated areas and rural villages may have limited to no access, but nowadays WIFI also building up to Himalaya so you can use easily on Everest region, Annapurna region prepare to pay Rs 100 to 200 for unlimited access.

Mobile phone coverage is generally good in urban areas, but can be patchy and less reliable in rural and mountainous areas. Ensure global roaming is activated on your phone before you arrive

Squat toilets are the most common toilets in Nepal. Always carry your own toilet paper and soap or hand sanitizers, as they aren’t usually provided

Cup of tea/chai = 40/50 NPR Bottle of beer = 200-300 NPR Simple lunch = 200 NPR Simple dinner = 400-500 NPR

It’s not recommended to drink the tap water in Nepal. Filtered water is a better option, try to use a refillable canteen or water bottle rather than buying bottled water. Remember to avoid ice in drinks and peel fruit before eating.

Credit cards are usually accepted by modern hotels, restaurants and medium-large shops in tourist areas. Smaller shops, cafes, market stalls and places in remote areas probably won’t have facilities that support credit cards, so ensure you have enough cash to cover expenses while in rural areas or when visiting smaller vendors and bazaars.

ATMs can be found in Nepal’s large cities. Smaller towns and isolated areas will have very few, or none at all, so have enough cash to cover purchases, as ATM access may not be available.

Absolutely. All passengers travelling with our company are required to purchase travel insurance before the start of your trip. Your travel insurance details will be recorded by your leader on the first day of the trip. Due to the varying nature, availability and cost of health care around the world, travel insurance is very much an essential and necessary part of every journey.

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